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Getting Audex to rip into Ogg Vorbis

Audex is a really nice (KDE) application to rip Audio CDs. It can lookup the CD information (so most of the time you don't have to type all the tracktitles yourself), it also tries to fetch the correct cover (and succeeds most of the time) and has very flexible configuration settings. Sadly, the version in the Ubuntu (currently 0.72b1) repositories has a few problems when you want to encode your songs in Ogg Vorbis. Here is an overview of the problems I had and how I hacked my way around them (without recompiling Audex), so I can use Audex to rip my CDs to Ogg Vorbis.

The most important problem is that Audex simply doesn't detect the Ogg Vorbis encoder. As documented in this Debian bug report Audex passes an incorrect parameter to oggenc to detect the version. While it should pass -V (uppercase V) it passes -v (lowercase v). To 'fix' (read: hack) this I took the following steps:

  • First check that your have the Ogg Vorbis encoder (oggenc) installed. In Ubuntu you can install it from the repositories by installing the 'vorbis-tools' package:
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    sudo apt-get install vorbis-tools
  • Now you should have the Vorbis encoder in /usr/bin/oggenc. But Audex won't detect it because it will call it with an incorrect paramter. So to fix this I first renamed oggenc to 'oggenc_real':
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    sudo mv /usr/bin/oggenc /usr/bin/oggenc_real

Dell Latitude E6510, screen and touchpad

When we got our new laptops at work (Dell Latitude E6510) we had some various problems while installing our preferred Linux distros on it.

The first problem which we all had was trying to get the screen to work. I could get it to work by booting with the following kernel params xforcevesa nomodeset (I also removed the default quiet splash). Now I just run with only nomodeset, which works without problems for me, but without 3D. Jan has compiled a patched kernel for Ubuntu with 3D support but with less colors.

Then the second problem: scrolling with the touchpad didn't work. To fix this I ran the following commands:

Upgraded to Ubuntu 10.10 (Maverick)

Today we saw the release of Ubuntu 10.10, codenamed Maverick Meerkat. Because I had some time today I immediately decided to upgrade my laptop. As usual the upgrade succeeded without too much trouble. Clicking a few buttons, letting the computer work for about an hour, reboot, and you are pretty much done.

Except for the few small things which break during upgrade. Out of experience from upgrading previous versions I know there are always a few small things you will have to fix. So here are the steps I did after the upgrade:

How to NetBoot and NetInstall Ubuntu

Normally when you want to install a new operating system on a computer, you either burn a CD or use a USB key with the installer for that operating system and make the computer boot from that media. There's another device you can boot your computer from: the network card.